Ethical racing

Picture this. Imagine you are a racer and you are in the race that you have been building up to for years. It is one of the most challenging race-tracks in the world and of the fastest and dangerous races in the world. Regardless of this, you are in the lead half-way through and recording brilliant lap-times. Then your worst nightmare happens. As you go along the track, you see marshalls waving flags at you, so you ease off the throttle and see the reason for the flags, your brother’s smashed-up machine is lying at the side of the road and you have no idea whether your fellow racer and brother is dead or alive. You cant stop so you speed up to get to the pit-stop to get news of your brother. Suddenly race position, fuel, tyres, none of it matters if the worst has happened to your brother.

Once in the pit lane, you flip the visor up and shout the all-important question over the noise of engines and the re-fuelling. You hear them shout “He’s OK!”. The relief floods in but as you speed off down the lane you wonder what ‘OK’ means. What if they didn’t really  know and were just saying that so you stayed focus on the race? Your lap times drop as you mull it over but you soon realise there is nothing to be gained by hanging about. As Colin Mcrae said, ‘If in doubt, flat out’. You’ve done it, the race is won but the glory is not there, just the feeling that you almost lost your brother.

This was what happened yesterday to Michael Dunlop and his brother William at the Senior race of the Isle of Man TT. What I dont like to think about is what the crew would have said to Michael in the pit stop if William had died?

The skill of these riders is astonishing – makes F1 look like a Sunday leisurely drive in comparison.

This blog is for Unicef.

Thanks for reading.

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Desperately seeking bikers (with boobs)

My husband has got a new helmet and pair of bike trousers. He didn’t have to change the size of his trousers, but his helmet did need to go up a size. I didn’t know that your head continues to expand into your thirties, but clearly this is the case  with my husband.

As part of his order, he was given car window stickers that read ‘Born to ride, forced to drive’. I first rode a motorbike when i was 14 and took to it like a duck to water, i wonder what could have happened if i had got into biking earlier. It certainly would have saved me a lot in fuel costs on the daily commute. I would have built up so much experience that would have helped me to ride the bigger bikes, i find them now rather intimidating because i worry if they get dropped thats it, im stuck.

Months have passed and i am stuck driving my estate, commuting on a bike now is impossible with the tiddlywinks in tow. I could go out for a ‘ride’ at the weekend but it feels wrong to be on my own when i could be with the family. Although i would enjoy it i would also feel a bit lonely riding out on my own.

I would love to have a girl friend who also rode a bike but it seems most of the female riders are lesbians, so have absolutely nothing in common with me.

Is there a biking Mum out there who is also in the same quandary. Female petrolheads keep their passion secret, particularly amongst other women. I used to stay up the small hours to watch an F1 GP live and last night was up past my bedtime watching highlights from the Isle of Man TT.

So it would be great to hear from any female bikers out there to exchange experiences and enjoy pep talks.

I am blogging every day for Unicef.

Thanks for reading.