Yes to lost minutes

Saying ‘yes’ is catching up with me. Sometimes, if you write something down in a list it helps you to see that actually there isn’t that much to sort out, so here goes…

– do parish council minutes, email all partners re web links, start post box listing application, start handover document, do tweet schedule before leave, supervise daughter’s first tutor session, get children used to childminder through booking in time with her, get the working party for playground off the ground (Scuse the pun), go to first meet with new team, do medical questionnaire, get road closure for school fair booked, contact parish council re: using green for said fair, find out how much was raised through textile recycling at school, get November dinner and dance bash booked, set-up childcare voucher scheme, put for sale signs in husbands truck (to sell-off as no longer needs it and we need more cash), get Sailing sessions booked in over Easter, sort out childminders sessions walking the dogs……I’m sure there was something else…oh yes, train for the swimathon.

Everyone has lists like these as long as their arms(s) so no wonder we are all running around like headless chickens with our heads either stuck in a computer or behind a steering wheel. While saying yes has opened up so many experiences and opportunities, there are times when just the experience of taking stock will suffice.

My baby boy said to me earlier, “Mummy why don’t you stand still”. I am always saying to him “just a minute” when those minutes are all I, and anyone else for that matter, has got..

This blog is for UNICEF.

Thanks for reading.

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An evolving Eve

I am cold and tired, it has been an exhausting week, hence 2 missed blog posts (£2 in the pot to Unicef). I can breathe a sigh of relief that within a week I have got a full-time job to cover off our financial issues (and consequential wobbly marriage moments), handed in my notice with my part-time employees (albeit reluctantly as it was such a good, but not lucrative, solution around children), contacted my referees, filled out a medical questionnaire, interviewed a childminder and nanny and agreed a start date with the childminder and organised increased hours at my son’s pre-school). Phew! I hadnt realised how stressful organising childcare can be as it is such an emotive choice because they are the most important people to you in the world. However I am very happy with our choice and hope it works out.

Now I have to get my career brain into gear again and my friend (who is an amazingly talented and driven entrepreneur) tweeted a really good blog link on how to be a more productive woman.

The trouble is half of the 7 steps, I am mentally and physically incapable of achieving (such as getting up immediately in the morning and reading as soon as you have woken – I am not even classed as human before 9am. In fact I only begin to ‘evolve’ once the school run is over and I have taken in some caffeine.

See if you can achieve any of the 7 steps (http://www.strangecharmed.com/productivity/7-habits-of-highly-productive-women/)

Good luck!

This blog is for Unicef.

Thanks for reading.

Free the robots

It is 10pm and I have baby boy sat next to me chattering away about superheroes, monsters and dinosaurs. He has a cold that is particularly snotty and not conducive to lying horizontal so is far happier sitting upright on the sofa…moments ago he was snoring. 

I have spent most of this evening firing out messages to all available childminders and nannies in the area as I have been offered the job. So now the reality has hit home that both children will need to be cared for from 7.30 til 6, with school and pre school inbetween. I want to try and keep them together if possible hence the search for a local childminder. If they could also take the dogs out and run the Hoover round the house that would be great too, as I am not fancying spending my weekend as Mrs Mop. I’m not OCD but I can’t quite bring myself to leave the cleaning until the point where I need to ‘muck out’ the house.

Because it will fall to me, I am under no illusion that just because I will be working, my other half will pick up more of a share in housework. No, I am a woman therefore I must do EVERYTHING. 

Maybe by the time our children are our age there will be robots to help or women will be emancipated from all assumptions of domestic duties….no I think robots are more likely..

This blog is for UNICEF.

Thanks for reading.

Working for spare change

Oh the guilt! Just went for another job interview. Although I hope we get it because we need the money it will mean baby boy going into full-time childcare 8.30 til 5. He has been in a childcare setting of one form or another since he was 9 months old but I have always managed to keep it to no more than 3 days per week. My only saving grace, if I get the job, is that he is now 3 and a bit years old so able to enjoy more of the typical activities on offer at nurseries.

As I browse through potentials though, I start to recall excerpts from a childcare documentary and the grieving family whose daughter suffocated to death in a Wendy house at a nursery. So any websites showing pictures of Wendy houses, particularly those with an upstairs (because the little girl suffocated on the window-ledge/step of the upper storey) made me wobble. 

You cannot put a price on a setting where you know your child will have a good and safe experience while you are working. But when this cost eats significantly into your earnings you wonder why you do it in the first place.

Then there is the issue of the dogs, we can’t bear to part with them so that will be £200 per month so they get a decent walk everyday. 

With any luck I will have some spare change at the end of the month to pay for parking at work..

This blog is for UNICEF.

Thanks for reading. 

Finding another me

When a Mum goes back to work, organising childcare is both complicated and a real emotional wrench. When I picked up my baby boy from pre-school today, he helped himself out of the school as soon as he saw my car pull up. I picked him up and he pressed his little chubby cheek so close to mine and cuddled me so tightly. The lady who runs the school had to tell him not to run out of school again because its dangerous but she wasnt as stern as she would have liked to be because he was just too cute. Although he is 3 he knows how to work the look. That is going to come in very handy when he is older.

I also face the issue of what happens with our 2 Jack Russells, who will have no-one to spend the day with when I return to work. I need doggy day care too. In fact the more I think about it, the more I realise how much of our current lives depends on me being at home working part-time.

But….as readers of my previous blog posts will know, somethings gotta give.

This blog is for Unicef.

Thanks for reading.

Right mindset for a guilty mum?

What is better? Working from home around the children and other commitments or commuting every day to an office, paying for childcare and returning home to spend evenings and weekends with your children?

I have done both and I can honestly say I havent the faintest idea. At work in an office, my baby boy is in childcare and I can focus on work at home my baby boy is with me most of the time but my focus isnt always on him and Peppa Pig episodes do come in handy, but I will always ensure during the day we get to do something purely for baby boy, even if it is just for a couple of hours. But I still feel guilty. I think that is the biggest problem deciding between both lifestyles, the guilt is equal.

You have to be really good at ‘mindfulness’ when working from home and looking after children as well. I have to let go of the to do list for periods so I cam focus on being Mum, but be ready to pick it up again as and when I need it. If I mix both, I become this ‘on edge’ mother and snappy and I hate that. So you have o be a chameleon but not let it f*** up your head.

My daughter isnt as affected as she is at school and I am still able to be there for her at the beginning and the end of the day but I still wonder if she has noticed a difference in my mindset. As for baby boy, I would love to know what he thinks too, but at 3 years old (almost) I wonder if he could tell me (or am I too afraid to ask).

This blog is for Unicef.

Thanks for reading.